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Author Topic: Keeping books for nostalgia value...bad idea?  (Read 1330 times)
RonClinton
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« on: March 09, 2017, 09:16:51 AM »

My shelves have once again hit critical mass (and then some), and I need to clear out around a shelf's worth of book (25 - 30) in order to make room for new additions; to minimize reorg, I need to pick books from authors w/ last names A through K.  Rather than the slow, painful process of picking books here and there to jettison, I'm considering choosing one author and getting rid of his work en masse.

I've been toying with getting rid of my Ray Garton collection...novels, short-story collections, chapbooks.  To be frank, his work -- what there's been of it, due to his reported health problems -- in the last decade has not impressed, and I doubt I would now buy anything new of his. 

But each time I think of chucking the collection, I remember how much I used to like his stuff, how his work was some of the earliest horror I read and collected decades ago in the late '80s/early '90s, how I would have at one time claimed him as one of my favorite genre authors.  I have a great dea of rose-glassed affection for his work in the same way that I do Dark Harvest, Cemetery Dance, and all those other early influences that were there from the beginning.

Do you keep books for nostalgia value, even if you don't particularly care for that author's work anymore?  I don't know, writing this post makes me think that perhaps I'm looking for an excuse to keep his stuff...maybe I am.  But on the other hands, something's gotta give, and getting rid of the Garton collection would sure address my shelf-space problem.
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BrianKeene1
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2017, 10:45:32 AM »

Turning 50, and watching friends my age pass on, my determining factor these days is "Will I ever read it again?" If the answer to that is "yes" or "maybe", I keep them. If it's "I enjoyed it, but probably won't get around to reading it again" then they go. Currently, I'm eyeing my 25-volume SPIRIT ARCHIVES hardcover collection. I love the Spirit. I love Will Eisner. But will I read them again before I pass on to the next level...?
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dannyboy121070
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2017, 12:15:01 PM »

Currently, I'm eyeing my 25-volume SPIRIT ARCHIVES hardcover collection. I love the Spirit. I love Will Eisner. But will I read them again before I pass on to the next level...?

 Jealous..... Sad I got on the Eisner bandwagon to late to pick these up, and now the thought/cost of picking up such a large set of books is enough to make this fanboy weep.

 I have a basement full of boxed-up comics and novels, and I do, stupidly, keep them for nostalgic value. I could pick up any old comic book, and have an instant flashback to where I was when I bought it, what was going on in my life....BUT, if I could find some rich sap to take them all off my hands, I would, but the prospect of selling things off individually....ugh.
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RonClinton
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2017, 12:16:04 PM »

A good point, Brian, but unfortunately if re-reading likelihood was the barometer to which I judged whether or not to keep a book, my ~3000 library/collection would be a miniscule fraction of its size.  Sometimes I wonder why I collect books...and while I've not yet figured that part out yet (other than I've always had the collector gene, starting with rocks and agates when I was four or five, then comic books, then etc. etc.), it's definitely not because I have plans to read my thousands of books again; I can count the number of books I've reread in my (own) fifty years on one hand.

Btw, I'm a Spirit fan, too -- I still have a lage pile of the Warren magazines from the 1970s (part of that comic collecting I mention above...all my other comics I sold along the way (save for two special comics), these are the only remnants from that pre-teen and teenage mania).
« Last Edit: March 09, 2017, 12:50:24 PM by RonClinton » Logged
njhorror
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2017, 01:13:55 PM »

I've got books in storage units, books in a garage, books in an empty house, books in a barn loft, books in my trunk, books at work, books I carry around with me like a fucking homeless person dragging his possessions down the street!!!


I may be in need of an intervention.
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RonClinton
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« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2017, 02:43:25 PM »

Keeping books for nostalgia value...bad idea?

I've got books in storage units, books in a garage, books in an empty house, books in a barn loft, books in my trunk, books at work, books I carry around with me like a fucking homeless person dragging his possessions down the street!!!


I may be in need of an intervention.

So that's be a...no?  Wink
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njhorror
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« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2017, 02:58:45 PM »

I'm not qualified to give an answer.
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John R Little
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« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2017, 04:46:18 PM »

I have kept books that I have enjoyed, because when I glance at them, it makes me feel good.  However, I also have space issues and I no longer keep every book by authors I like.  If there's an author I have 10 books by, but I only loved 3 of them, I can get rid of the other 7, but keep the 3 that were special to me.
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markgunnells
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« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2017, 04:49:37 PM »

If I like it I keep it. If I didn't like it but it's an author I have everything by, I keep it. If it's a book I tried by an author I'm hot and cold about and it didn't work for me, I give it to the used bookstore.

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jimallcorn
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« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2017, 05:31:40 PM »

My shelves have once again hit critical mass (and then some), and I need to clear out around a shelf's worth of book (25 - 30) in order to make room for new additions; to minimize reorg, I need to pick books from authors w/ last names A through K.  Rather than the slow, painful process of picking books here and there to jettison, I'm considering choosing one author and getting rid of his work en masse.

I've been toying with getting rid of my Ray Garton collection...novels, short-story collections, chapbooks.  To be frank, his work -- what there's been of it, due to his reported health problems -- in the last decade has not impressed, and I doubt I would now buy anything new of his. 

But each time I think of chucking the collection, I remember how much I used to like his stuff, how his work was some of the earliest horror I read and collected decades ago in the late '80s/early '90s, how I would have at one time claimed him as one of my favorite genre authors.  I have a great dea of rose-glassed affection for his work in the same way that I do Dark Harvest, Cemetery Dance, and all those other early influences that were there from the beginning.

Do you keep books for nostalgia value, even if you don't particularly care for that author's work anymore?  I don't know, writing this post makes me think that perhaps I'm looking for an excuse to keep his stuff...maybe I am.  But on the other hands, something's gotta give, and getting rid of the Garton collection would sure address my shelf-space problem.

Ron, I'm a big fan of Ray Garton's work & a longtime friend of his on Facebook. So, if you're seriously thinking of just getting rid of your Garton books please keep me in mind. I'm not in a position to buy anything at the moment as I've got some unexpected medical bills to take care of from my recent neck surgery.
But, I would be willing to pay postage. I'd just hate to see such a nice collection of his work be donated to some random bookstore.
So, please, keep me in mind.
Peace.
         Jim
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Adam James
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« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2017, 06:07:45 PM »

Turning 50, and watching friends my age pass on, my determining factor these days is "Will I ever read it again?" If the answer to that is "yes" or "maybe", I keep them. If it's "I enjoyed it, but probably won't get around to reading it again" then they go. Currently, I'm eyeing my 25-volume SPIRIT ARCHIVES hardcover collection. I love the Spirit. I love Will Eisner. But will I read them again before I pass on to the next level...?

The Spirit books are something you give to one of your kids. But, then again I'm a comic nerd.

Ron,
Like some one else said, I think it was John, you don't have to have a complete works. Keep the books that hold sentimental value, the others just take up space. That's my advice.
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RonClinton
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« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2017, 06:22:30 PM »



Ron,
Like some one else said, I think it was John, you don't have to have a complete works. Keep the books that hold sentimental value, the others just take up space. That's my advice.

Yeah, you and John give sage advice, and logically I know that's the smart way to go. Picking and choosing, though, even among one author's work, is akin to that pulling-a-BandAid-off-slowly feeling that I was trying to spare myself.  Guess I was thinking an en masse purge would be easier...but in truth it probably wouldn't.  I don't know why it seems like selective reduction would be tougher...I'm not even what I'd call a completist...more like completist'ish.  I guess it's that 'ish that gets me.  Sad
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kresby
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« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2017, 04:54:54 AM »

This thread is hitting home for me. I have been selling books for about 3 years now via shocklines auctions. Over 800 items later it is getting very difficult to send more books out even though I still have thousands of them. I have been picking and choosing. First went doubles. Then went stuff I care not for. Now it's a game of what has the least emotional  kick tied to it. I still can't sell any Delirium Books now that most of the doubles are gone as it's too hard to break up the complete collection. I have sold different editions of books and kept one such as - sell the paperback and keep the hard cover or vs. It is a battle as I love my books.
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RonClinton
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« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2017, 05:01:51 PM »

This thread is hitting home for me. . . . Now it's a game of what has the least emotional  kick tied to it. . . .  It is a battle as I love my books.

Yep, it's a game with no winners.  Sad

Still haven't decided what I'm going to do.  I am, however, eyeing my Simon Clark books, or at least the latter half of them, since the only reasons I'm keeping those volumes are my complete'ish bent and the awesome Hale UK dj art.

I think my "en masse" strategy is one I just can't do right now...so I'll probably get rid of a few Gartons, some Simon Clarks, and several various books.  It's that peeling-the-BandAid-off-slowly tactic I thougth I didn't want...but now it seems like actually the least painful, arduous, and wrenching way to go.*

*Third-world problem.

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Adam James
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« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2017, 06:04:23 PM »

first world problems, man. Lol
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