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Author Topic: Horror as I Know it  (Read 447 times)
Authorfan
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« on: April 20, 2017, 01:54:23 PM »

I kind of miss the '80s horror boom. I was a teen then and everywhere you looked horror beckoned, whether it was via the weekly release of a horror film or via a slew of new paperback originals at the local bookstore, Fangoria...  Like many of you, I had the chance to live at a time when you actually had to walk to stores to glimpse at the latest book titles. Imagine that. It may be the old coot in me talking  but it really was the best of times. Oh I had my shares of problems like everyone else but those moments spent at the movie theater or at Coles bookstore in Canada to look at the BIG horror section or in my bedroom leafing through the latest Fangoria or reading the latest King are to me as precious as the moment I got hitched to my partner of twenty-some years. I’m aware I still have a lot to look forward to but, damn, wouldn’t it be great to relive those moments but in today’s world? It probably wouldn’t be as grand as I think it was but I’d love to give it a try just for a few hours at least.

Martin
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MarkSieber
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 02:29:45 PM »

Those were the best days, and we didn't need an Internet. I loved the mall, and the bookstores and music stores in them. Video stores were wonderful. Movies were a lot more fun, and they weren't made on computers. There were used bookstores everywhere, and the real fun was in the hunt.

Italian horror was all the rage with the gorehounds. Horror comedies and sequels were rampant, and so what if a lot were cheesy?

We still had drive-ins here in my town. Independently owned walk-in theaters, which would get odd stuff that otherwise might have slipped through the cracks.

My life is better in every way now, but I miss the horror days of the 80's very badly.
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BrianKeene1
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 04:18:02 PM »

That was my era too, and I miss it dearly -- but whats interesting to me is that these are boom times for the genre once again, but with a different generation of readers, a different method of distribution (Amazon and Kindle instead of the grocery store rack), and a new generation of authors -- ones that don't get discussed much by old folks like us, but whom Millennial horror readers are devouring. It's fascinating and heartening to watch unfold.
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RonClinton
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« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2017, 06:53:56 PM »

I was there in all its glory, and, you bet, I'd love to revisit that era. 

Brian's likely correct that a different boom is occuring, but he's also correct that for those who were there in the original '80s/early '90s horror boom and now sport a bit of gray in our hair, today's boom just doesn't at all feel the same nor have the same macabre charm.  Nor must it, I suppose...but that said I'm glad I got to experience the boom I did...coulda done without the its bust, though.  Sad 

But from those ashes came the new boom...and so it goes.
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njhorror
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« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2017, 08:08:43 AM »


Yeah, me too, me too , me too, well ok, me too, me too, ya fook one sheep, me too, pretty much, ok . . .
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Jonathan Janz
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« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2017, 09:49:44 AM »

I'm in a little different position here because I didn't start reading horror until the summer of 1988. However, at that time, there were still rotating racks of Stephen King books all over the place (which is what led to my love of horror).

Now, I am old enough to remember--vividly--how prevalent horror films were back in the early-to-mid eighties. A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, for instance, scared the living daylights out of me when I was a little kid. I used to wear out the local video store when my grandparents would take me there, and more than any other genre, I would rent horror movies.

As for today, I'm of the strong belief that we're experiencing a growing/impending boom in the genre. I have many reasons for this belief, but I do think we are beginning to experience a new Golden Age, and more importantly, I think that Golden Age is going reach the heights that were reached back in the 80s.

Only time will tell.
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MarkSieber
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2017, 03:52:33 AM »

I'm excited about a lot of new writers, but they probably aren't the same ones as the cool kids today like. Caroline Kepnes, Grady Hendrix, Daniel Kraus, Riley Sager, etc.
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Nicole Cushing
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2017, 11:13:44 AM »

My parents are uptight conservative Christians, so I wasn't allowed access to horror books (and ditto with films). However, it was harder for them to censor my TV viewing. So my access to the horror boom was via television. (Tales from the Darkside, Friday the 13th: The Series, the miniseries adaptation of It,, Freddy's Nightmares, etc.)

As for a new boom, well...I'm less optimistic than several of you are. (But then again, that's my nature.) I think booms are best evaluated in retrospect. Ten years from now, we'll be able to tell if this is a boom time. Until then, it's impossible to judge it with anything close to objectivity.

That's my two cents. Your mileage may vary.
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Authorfan
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2017, 02:40:36 PM »

I got to say the last decade or so brought new authors to read like Adam Cesare, Jonathan Janz, Kristopher Rufty, Hunter Shea, Matt Serafini, Carlton Mellick III, Nick Cutter...

So yeah, I guess all is not lost.  Still...  The '80s, c'mon, what a great time for horror.

Martin
 
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